The Awakening

Kate ChopinWhat the hell?! Why does every classic story I pick-up (in my current quest to broaden my literary foundations) have to do with suicide? The Japanese might have made an art form out of sepuku, but western literature isn’t far behind.

I just finished Kate Chopin‘s 1899 short novel “The Awakening”. Why did I choose this book at all? I don’t know. It wasn’t even on “my list”! It was something different I guess, different from what I usually read. Chopin is considered an early feminist. The book is written from a woman’s point of view (like I’m supposed to care about that?!). It has romance (I’m told I should read more romances, go figure). It deals with women’s issues in an unapologetic way, in some respects similar to Tess of the d’Urbervilles (written by a man, 8 years before). Though they deal with separate issues and themes, both books were considered scandalous for their brazen depictions of female sexuality, so I’m lumping them together. See how that works?! I’m the blogger, I say it works.

What did I think about the book? Ummm… I thought it was well-written. It kept my interest (wasn’t sure I was going to continue past the first few pages, at first). The author’s attention to detail gave engaging insights into the lives of affluent New Orleans at the end of the 19th century (seems pretty nice except for the whole hurricane thing).  I was particularly engrossed by the way the author carries the reader through Edna Pontellier’s (main character) evolving thoughts and opinions of her marriage, her children, her freedom (what there is of it), and her life. Her actions and choices do not need to be commended to be understood.

“Ah! si tu savais / Ce que tes yeux me disent—”

4 out of 5


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